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CORRIGENDA 10-14-15 (PDF, 610 KB)

TEMA 2015

 

October 16-18, 2015

Shared Cultures

TEMA

XXV Texas Medieval Association Annual Conference

 

Shared Cultures

President: Dr. Yasmine Beale-Rivaya

Much of our scholarly activity is centered on identifying and describing the margins, those aspects that make a particular event, community, or place different from rest. This approach presumes that the scholarship already has a full understanding of what is normal, typical, or customary in those communities or geographical settings. Rather than focusing on the marginalia and the distinct, this year's conference strives to understand the common, ordinary, and shared spaces.

 

CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS

Yasmine Beale-Rivaya

David Navarro

Leslie A. Garrett

Michael Conner

 

SPECIAL THANKS TO

Lyda Guz

Elizabeth Prado

Jorge Arriagada

Nabila Aikawa

Núria Enríquez

Adam Clark

Allison Yakel

Arielle Akines

Annette Zapata

Dagar's catering

 

EVENT SPONSORS

Dr. Gene Bourgeois, Office of the Provost

Dr. Michael J. Hennessy, Dean, College of Liberal Arts

Dr. Andrea Golato, Dean, The Graduate College

Department of Modern Languages

Department of English

University Lectures Committee

Honors College

Center for the Study of the Southwest

 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15 - 6:30-8:30 pm

WELCOME RECEPTION

Wingate by Wyndham Hotel San Marcos, Business Center

Address: 108 Interstate 35 Frontage Rd, San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone:(512) 754-6621

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 - 9:00-10:15 am

All Conference pannels are held in the LBJ Student Center. Parking is available in the LBJ Parking Garage (see maps and directions at the end of the program).

SESSION 1 - CHAUCER AT LARGE LBJ 3.9

Moderator: Bruce C. Brasington (West Texas A&M University)

1. Maria Salinas (UTEP): "Space and Identity in The Miller's Tale"

2. Sadie Hash (University of Houston): “At First Sight: Gaze in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde”

3. Dorothy Lawrenson (Texas State University): “Points of Contact: The Functions of Rivers in Spenser’s Poetry”

4. Nancy Bradley Warren (Texas A&M University): "Shared Religious Cultures: Chaucer, Lollardy, and Continental Female Spirituality"

SESSION 2 - TENNYSON AND THE ARTHURIAN CYCLE LBJ 3.10

Moderator: Whitney May (Texas State University)

1. David D. Day (University of Houston Clear Lake): “The Carlylean Transformation of Malory in Tennyson's 'The Coming of Arthur'

2. Tom Hanks (Baylor University): "Sharing Cultures Malory's Multiple (Di)Lemmas"

3. Leigh Smith (East Stroudsburg University): "Shared Language, Shared Perspective: Thomas Malory and John Walton’s Boethius"

SESSION 3 - THE MARGINAL, DISFIGURED AND CRIPPLED LBJ 3.11

Moderator: Susan Morrison (Texas State University)

1. Connie L. Scarborough (Texas Tech University): “"Written on the Skin: The Borderland of the Leper"

2. Kristan Foust Ewin (University of North Texas): “"Late Medieval Judenstrafe: ‘'between two mad or biting dogs ... hang him from his feet'"”

3. Joseph Cherny (University of Saint Thomas): “Pain and the Privation Account of Evil”

SESSION 4 - MEDIEVAL PROTO-FEMINISM LBJ 3.13

Moderator: Elizabeth Makowski (Texas State University)

1. Amber Dunai (Texas A&M University-Central Texas): "Arguing with Lady Love: Mechthild
von Magdeburg's Courtly Mysticism"

2. Jacob M. Baum (Texas Tech University): “Sensory Language in the Diary of Katherina Tucher (d. 1448)"

3. Judith Laird (Austin Community College): "The Cultures of Margery Kempe"

 

COFFEE BREAK 10:15-10:30 am

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 - 10:30-12:00 pm

 

SESSION 5 - Roundtable: THE FUTURE OF MIDDLE ENGLISH STUDIES LBJ 3.15

Organizers: Andrew Kraebel (Trinity University) and Leah Schwebel (Texas State University)
Moderator: Patricia Clare Ingham (Indiana University)

Nancy Bradley Warren (Texas A&M University)
Kimberly Fonzo (University of Texas at SA)
Emily Houlik-Ritchey (Rice University)
Andrew Kraebel (Trinity University)
Elizabeth Scala (University of Texas at Austin)
Leah Schwebel (Texas State University)
Barbara Zimbalist (University of Texas at El Paso)

SESSION 6 - SEX, SWORDS, AND MAGIC LBJ 3.11

Moderator: Sharon Ugalde (Texas State University)

1. Sarah Jane Sprouse (Texas Tech University): "From ides aglæcwif to “shebeast”: The Loss of the Wrecend in Thomas Meyer’s Translation of Beowulf"

2. Brian McFadden (Texas Tech University): "Uneasy Neighbors on the Page: Framing the Monster Images
of Wonders of the East"

3. Lesleigh Jones (University of Massachusetts in Boston): "The Crime of Judas: The Influence of
Gregorius and Oedipus Myths"

SESSION 7 - THE CRUSADES LBJ 3.10

Chair and Moderator: Allison Yakel (University of Houston)

1. David Wells (Houston Community College): “The Campaigns of Eberhard von Monheim, 1238-1340"

2. Scott Hieger (University of Dallas): "Memories of the Father: Comparing Byzantine Accounts of the First and Second Crusades"

3. Paul Dow Adams (Texas State University): “Tall Tales from the Byzantine Borderlands: Frontier
Themes in Digenes Akritas"

4. Paul Chevedden (Independent Scholar): "Panic: The Modern Study of the Crusades, 1965-2015"

SESSION 8- MARTYRS AND SAINTS LBJ 3.13

Moderator: Mickey Abel (North Texas University)

1. Matthew Kuefler (San Diego State University): "The Convertible Saint: Expeditus through Time and Space"

2. Sister Madeleine Grace, CVI (University of Saint Thomas): "A Review of the Concept of Martyrdom in Light of the Martyrs of Cordoba"

3. Rachel Hiser (University of North Texas): “An Eleventh-Century Fresco Reborn: A Spatial Analysis of San Clemente Rome”

4. Raymond E. Stockstad (Texas State University): “Separated by Church and State: Excommunication, Beheading, and the ‘Othering’ of Ideas”

LUNCH - 12:00-1:30 pm
Options available at the LBJ Food Court on the 2nd Floor

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 - 1:30-3:00 pm

 

SESSION 9- MEDIEVAL MUSIC AND PERFORMANCE LBJ 3.11

Moderator: Yuri Porras (Texas State University)

1. Leonard Callaway II (Texas A&M): “Old Bangum in East Texas: A Medieval Ballad Travels Through Time”

2. John Howe (Texas Tech University): “Joining the Choir: The Role of Music in Tenth and Eleventh-Century Schools"

SESSION 10 - RELIGIOUS INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION LBJ 3.10

Moderator: Catherine Jaffe (Texas State University)

1. Bruce C. Brasington (West Texas A&M University): "De testibus tractaturi: A Twelfth-
Century Italian Canonistic Treatise on Legal Procedure"

2. Dale Streeter (Eastern New Mexico University): "French Bishops in Foreign Dioceses: Clerical
Careers in the Fourteenth Century"

3. Kathryne Beebe (University of Texas at Arlington): “The Needle and the Haystack: Social
History and the Elusive Male ‘Virtual Pilgrim’”

4. Elise Leal (Baylor University): ““Examples of Modesty, Piety, and Grace”: Female Piety and
Domesticity in Medieval and Early Modern Sermons”

SESSION 11-TOLEDO AND THE BORDER LBJ 3.13

Moderator: Carla Rahn Phillips (University of Minnesota, Emerita)

1. Jason Busic (Denison University): "The Triune God, The Incarnation, and The Normalcy of The Mozarabs of Toledo"

2. Adnan Kadhim (Al al-Bayt, Jordan): “Toledo como un ejemplo único de encuentro de culturas”

3. Iledys González (Sapienza University of Rome): "Andanzas poéticas: Del camino y sus sentidos en la poesía castellana medieval"

4. Paul Chevedden (Independent Scholar): "Panic: The Modern Study of the Crusades, 1965-2015"

COFFEE BREAK 3:00-3:15 pm

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 - 3:15-4:45 pm

 

SESSION 12 - TOLKIEN IN THE TWENTIETH-FIRST CENTURY LBJ 3.10

Organizer and Moderator: Robert Tally (Texas State University)

1. Shannan Buchholz (Texas State University): “All Would Love Her and Despair: Galadriel, Feminism, and Power”

2. Devin Baumann (Texas State University): “The Transcendence of Mortality in Middle-Earth”

3. Jaye Dozier (Texas State University): “Above All Shadows Rides the Sun: Redemption and Resurrection in The Lord of the Rings"

SESSION 13 - ENGLISH GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE PANEL LBJ 3.13

Organizer and Moderator: Susan Harris (Texas State University)

1. Alison Estrada Carpenter (Texas State University): “Childhood, Gender, and Home in the Middle Ages"
2. Taylor Kniphfer (Baylor University): "The King of Faction: Roger Mortimer and the Royal Household"
3. Christopher Yang (Baylor University): "Personification in Piers Plowman: An Investigation of the Art of Story Telling"
 

SESSION 14 - THE MEDIEVALIST AND THE TEACHING UNIVERSITY: A ROUNDTABLE IN MEMORY OF JAMES R. KING LBJ 3.15

Organizer & Moderator: Devin Fields (Texas Tech University)

Don Kagay (Albany State University)
Peter Fields (Midwestern State University)
Craig Nakashian (Texas A&M-Texarkana)
Dale Streeter (Eastern New Mexico University)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 - 5:00-7:45 pm

TEMA KEYNOTE I

Opening Remarks by: Yasmine Beale-Rivaya (Texas State University)
Keynote Speaker Presentation by: Leah Schwebel (Texas State University)

Dr. Patricia Clare Ingham
Indiana University
"Curious Novelties"

Wittliff Collections, Alkek Library

Followed by reception

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 - 9:00-10:30 am

 

SESSION 15 - MEDIEVAL LEARNING AND WRITING LBJ 3.9

Moderator: David Navarro (Texas State University)

1. Edgar Laird (Texas State University, Emeritus): "Greek, Arabic, and Latin in Norman Sicily"
2. Aaron Moreno (St. Mary’s University): “"Greek to You and Me: Performing Identity in Medieval Sicily"”
3. Lane Sobehrad (Texas State University): “Classical Greek Continuities in Medieval Prologue Writing”
4. Judd Burton (South Texas College): “Medieval Spaces:  Teaching the Transition from Late Antiquity into the Dark Ages”

SESSION 16 - EPIC IN IBERIA AND THE NEW WORLD LBJ 3.13

Moderator: William Phillips (University of Minnesota)

1. Alexander J. McNair (Baylor University): “El Cid in the Southwest: “Victorioso vuelve...” in the New Mexican Ballad Repertoire”

2. Theresa Vann (College of St. Benedict/St. John's University): "Christian Muslim Contacts on the Fringes of the  Mediterranean"

3. Britt Mize (Texas A & M University): "Viewing Medieval Legends of Judas Iscariot through the Lens of Adaptation Theory"

SESSION 17 - MEDIEVAL VISUAL SYMBOLISM LBJ 3.10

Moderator: Beth Allison Barr (Baylor University)

1. A. Dallin Grimm (Baylor University): "Combatting 'the very Great Destruction and Impoverishment of the Land': An Analysis of Socioeconomic and Gendered Responses to Dress-Anxiety in the Post-Black Death Period”

2. Annelise Henley (Baylor University): “Stained Images: Changing Depictions of Female Piety in Late Medieval English Churches"

3. Sarah Shivers (University of North Texas): "Water and Stone: Visual Constructions and Landscape Development at Glastonbury Abbey"

4. Tawnee Oxtra (Texas State University, Alumna): "Illuminating the Beautiful: Identifying Shared Representations of Beauty in Medieval European Literature and Art"

COFFEE BREAK 10:15-10:30 am

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 - 10:30-12:00 pm

 

SESSION 18 - ROYAL WOMEN IN TIME OF WAR: A COMPARISON OF THE KINGDOMS OF CASTILE AND ARAGON IN THE
SECOND HALF OF THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY
LBJ 3.9

Moderator: Lucy Harney (Texas State University)

1. L. J. Andrew Villalon (University of Texas at Austin): "Wives, Mistresses, Lovers, and Daugthers: The Fortunes of War for Royal Women Living in Late Fourteenth Century Castile"

2. Don Kagay (Albany State University): "A Royal Woman at War: Eleanor of Sicily"

SESSION 19 - BETWEEN GAMES AND REASON LBJ 3.11

Moderator: Nieves Pujalte (Texas State University)

1. John Stalko (The Center for Thomistic Studies): "Aquinas' Fifth Way versus Paley's Intelligent Design Argument"

2. María Luisa Gómez-Ivanov (Texas State University): “El tahúr y la alcahueta, aliados de lucrativos juegos prohibidos en Salamanca hacia 1497: Lucena, Repetición de amores y arte de axedrez”

3. Moira Di Mauro-Jackson (Texas State University): “Games and the Absurd: an Interdisciplinary Investigation of the Evolution of the Card Game of Scopa as Narrative Trope Throughout the Ages”

SESSION 20 - AMONG RUNES AND KNIGHTS LBJ 3.10

Moderator: Susan Morrison (Texas State University)

1. Matt Hudson (Texas State University): "Utopia’s Borders: the Realm of the Fairy-Story in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"
2. Hope Swearingen (Texas State University): "The Wyrd and the Word: Intersections of Beliefs and Language in “The Seafarer""
3. Larry Bonds (McMurry University): “Beowulf’s Witty Response to Unferð’s Verbal Attack: “Worda ond Worca” and "Puns on Git and Wit""

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 - 10:30-12:00 pm

 

SESSION 21 - LO MEDIEVAL EN LA AMÉRICA HISPANA / THE "MEDIEVAL" IN THE SPANISH AMERICAS LBJ 3.13

Organizer and Moderator: Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez (Texas State University)

1. José Carlos de la Puente Luna (Texas State University): "Incas pecheros y caballeros hidalgos: la desintegración del orden incaico y la génesis de la nobleza incaica colonial en el Cuzco del siglo XVI"

2. Luis Alberto García (Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León): "Medieval Continuities in Colonial Texas and Northeastern Mexico: Political Representation through Military Participation"

3. Jean A. Stuntz (West Texas A&M University): "Family Law in Spain and New Spain: Las Siete Partidas and the Recopilación"

12:00-1:45 pm

LUNCH

Provided and served at LBJ Ballroom

medieval luncheon

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS

Dr. Yasmine Beale-Rivaya (Texas State University)

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2:00-3:15 pm

TEMA KEYNOTE II
Keynote Speaker Presentation: Connie Scarborough (Texas Tech University)

Dr. Michael Harney University of Texas at Austin
"Ecumenical Empiricism: Medieval Travel Literature and the Dissemination of Geographical Knowledge"

The history of European and Spanish travel literature in the later Middle Ages confirms an increasing tendency among travel writers to transcend the influence of late classical geographers, especially Pliny and Isidore. Earlier medieval travel literature tended to present exotic phenomena in the terms of a formulaic notional geography, biology, and ethnography inherited from late-classical authors. In the earlier travel works, human or humanoid races are thus represented by paraphrastic thumbnail sketches borrowed from that earlier tradition. In the late-fourteenth, and throughout the fifteenth century, the old raree show of dog-headed men, monopodes, Amazons, and other fabulous races begins to be replaced by a more nuanced and accurate ethnic portraiture. Perhaps under the influence of Marco Polo’s Travels the most widely read medieval travel book, fifteenth-century Spanish travel writing distinguishes itself by an increasing commitment to detailed exactitude in its descriptions of natural history and human folkways. We note a growing tendency to identify natural phenomena, and to describe alien peoples, with greater attention to real-world particulars. This arguably modernizing and empirical trend can be attributed to a notion of narrative accountability. We no longer see a perfunctory boilerplate presentation of the usual exotic suspects. Authors instead feel obliged to share credible information with their audiences. Travel works are apparently composed in response to a climate of realistic expectations among their readers. This readership has a popular aspect, as when Marco Polo and his imitators self-consciously address all social categories. It also has an authoritarian aspect, as when the Castilian diplomat González de Clavijo implicitly dedicates his account to his royal master, Enrique III. In both cases, late–medieval trave11iterature's verisimilar accountability to its readers is distinct from, but possibly antecedent to, the emergence of a spirit of actual scientific empiricism. What is expressed, rather, is a sense of metaphorically extending the Christian, Eurocentric eucumene through the dissemination of purportedly accurate geographical knowledge.
 

LBJ Student Center Ballroom

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 3:30-5:00 pm

 

SESSION 22 - IBERIAN JEWISH EXEGESIS AND THE ALPHONSINE'S SCRIPTORIUM LBJ 3.9

Organizer: David Navarro (Texas State University)
Chair and Moderator: Yasmine Beale-Rivaya (Texas State University)

1. David Navarro (Texas State University): "'Estorias' rabínicas de la General estoria en el episodio del Diluvio (Gén. 6-9)"

2. Francisco Peña-Fernández (University of British Columbia): "Representación de la historia de José y sus hermanos en la General estoria"

3. David Wacks (University of Oregon): "The Cantar de cantares in the General estoria of Alfonso X: Between Jewish and Christian Exegesis"

SESSION 23 - SHARING FAITH: THE CHALLENGES OF GENDER IN THE ENGLISH CHURCH, 1400-1700 LBJ 3.13

Organizer: Beth Allison Barr (Baylor University)
Chair: Elizabeth Marvel (Baylor University)

1. Beth Allison Barr (Baylor University): “The Thin Blue Line: Women, Preaching, and Sacred Space in Late Medieval English Churches”

2. Lynneth Miller Stingley (Baylor University): ““Karolleth No More for Crystys Awe”: Women,
Sacrilege, and Dance in Handlyng Synne”

3. Elise Leal (Baylor University): ““Examples of Modesty, Piety, and Grace”: Female Piety and
Domesticity in Medieval and Early Modern Sermons”

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 3:30-5:00 pm

 

SESSION 24 - MEDIEVAL HAGIOGRAPHY LBJ 3.10

Moderator: Sister Madeleine Grace CVI (University of Saint Thomas)

1. Tania Kolarik (University of North Texas): "Moving Towards Heaven: The Late Antique Procession
in the Mosaics of Santa Maria Maggiore"
2. Wendy Wood (University of Houston): "The Desert Fathers and Their Desert Search: A Study of the Christian Primitive"
3. Joshua Logsdon (Texas Tech University): "Virtutes Sanctarum Familiarum: The Significance to
Lay Piety of Family Virtues in Eleventh Century English Saints’ Lives"

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 5:15-6:15 pm

 

BOOK AND READING PRESENTATION LBJ 3.15

Chair and Moderator: Robert Tally (Texas State University)

Dr. Susan Morrison, Texas State University
Grendel's Mother: The Saga of the Wyrd-Wife

saga of the wyrd wife cover

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 6:30 pm

Students' social and mentoring

See Whitney May at the Registration Desk

All students welcome

 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18, 10:30-11:30 am

 

SESSION 25 - TEMA BUSINESS AND PLANNING MEETING LBJ 3.15

 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2:00 pm

OPTIONAL GUIDED TOUR OF SAN MARCOS GLASS BOTTOM BOATS. MUST HAVE RESERVED AT $7.00 PER PERSON

FOR FURTHER QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT YASMINE BEALE-RIVAYA at yb10@txstate.edu